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SNV Annual Report 2017

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In 2017 SNV improved the lives of 6.4 million people. We also created long-lasting systemic change. Our projects kick-start markets, strengthen institutions, and establish conducive legal and policy environments.

What enables us to create these results?

Firstly, our local staying power. For decades, SNV has been present in countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. We speak the local language. We have partnerships with local governments, enterprises, and civil society. Our local knowhow helps us to customise our approaches to what works in each of the countries where we work.

Our diverse staff of over 1,200 professional staff have deep subject knowledge in agriculture, energy, and WASH. Our expertise in some areas has long been recognised. We support agricultural value chains. We kick-start biogas markets. We help rural communities to stop open defecation. In the past year we have deepened our expertise in other areas such as urban sanitation, climate resilience, nutrition, and off-grid electricity. This report presents our results in established and emerging fields.

Smart development requires integrated approaches. SNV’s 2017 turnover was €108 million. I am confident that our total impact is much more than the sum of our individual projects. The real value of our work is where our teams come together in villages, districts, and countries. Creating youth employment is one exciting way we work across sectors.

SNV is a learning organisation. I am excited that this annual report reviews our support to local private sector development. Over the years, we have built our appreciation of how value chains work in agricultural production and in service delivery. We apply our knowhow on behaviour change and demand creation to clean cooking, rural sanitation, and nutrition teams. We help local firms to develop business models. We help poor people gain access to finances so they can pay for products and services. This boosts a sense of ownership and sustainability, and avoids subsidies.

Also, we shine a spotlight on result based financing to help develop small and medium-sized enterprises to deliver sanitation and energy services to the poor.

I joined SNV in January 2018. One reason I joined is our ability to adapt. Indeed SNV has reinvented itself several times in our 52 year history. The continuous growth in our order intake, which reached €194 million in 2017, shows that SNV has positioned itself as a go to development organisation. I am looking forward to working with the other members of the Managing Board and colleagues across the globe. We will consolidate this progress, to step up on implementation, and to continue to evolve in the future.


Meike van Ginneken, Chief Executive Officer
On behalf of the Managing Board



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This combination of direct and indirect impact became very clear to me on a visit to Quang Binh province in Vietnam, in February 2018.

Members of a rice cooperation told us how SNV helped them to increase their income through modern farming techniques. Also, both female and male farmers passionately told us how household and community dialogues had helped families to share household tasks, and control over income.

That same afternoon, we visited the Vice-chair of Provincial People's Committee. He told us how the provincial authorities have scaled up a microfinance scheme for female entrepreneurs, originally set up by SNV in the early 2000s.

By 2005, the project had benefitted 11,500 women entrepreneurs. Since project close, a multitude of that number have benefitted from the scheme.

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In 2017, SNV helped to improve the lives of 6.4 million people by developing and implementing locally-owned approaches. Our impact went well beyond these direct beneficiaries as we improved markets for the poor and strengthened governance systems.

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Sustainable markets for agriculture 
1.4 million people benefitted directly through increased income in over forty value chains around the globe.
Examples:Horticulture CambodiaDairy Kenya

Sustainable nutrition for all
175,000 people benefitted from improved food access and nutrition security.
Example: Nutrition Uganda-Zambia

Climate resilience
The livelihoods of 162,000 people became more climate resilient.
Examples:Water for Agriculture KenyaShaded Cocoa Ghana







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Mr. Nam Trieu, a farmer in Nhung Mien, Ca Mau, Vietnam

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We continued to focus on developing sustainable energy markets:

72,000 people gained access to a bio-digester.
Examples:Biogas VietnamBiogas Scale-Up Ethiopia

532,000 people gained access to electricity.
Examples:RBF for Solar Markets TanzaniaSolar Mini-grid Zimbabwe

198,000 people gained access to clean cooking.
Example: Market Acceleration Clean Cookstoves Mekong 


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Amman Family, Ethiopia

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Rural sanitation at scale
We helped 2.9 million people gain access to sanitation while 1.9 million people commenced handwashing with soap. Example: Sustainable Sanitation & Hygiene for All 

Stepping up on city-wide urban sanitation
We focus on a mix of on-site and off-site sanitation services. Examples: Pro-poor Market-based sanitation in Bangladesh WASH SDG Programme

Leveraging the private sector
We helped 680,000 people gain access to basic drinking water supply services. 
Example: PPP Water Service Mali 



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Enid Kajumba, Deputy Chief Administrative Officer, Kyenjojo Ditrict, Uganda

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Leveraging private investments is an essential element in our approach to obtain sustainable scaling.
Example: Innovations Against Poverty

In some cases, the private sector pays for the support SNV provides to communities. Example: Shea Butter Ghana

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SNV has built a track-record in RBF to scale up service provision. RBF has proven to be a powerful means to attract private firms to expand service provision into underserved regions.

Our role varies from being the service provider ourselves and being paid incentives to managing RBF projects
and thus paying incentives to others after verification of results. Examples: RBF Pico-Solar Tanzania Sustainable Sanitation & Hygiene for All



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In 2017, SNV implemented six dedicated youth employment projects in seven countries. Some of these projects started fairly recently.

SNV’s Opportunities for Youth Employment (OYE) project realised employment for over 15.000 youth, using a so called push-match-pull approach.

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We improved markets for the poor and strengthened governance systems in Latin America, Africa and Asia.

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By sector
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Agriculture is our largest sector, followed by WASH and energy. Many of our projects involve cross cutting activities as well.

By sector
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By donors
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Thanks to the support of our funders we improved the lives of 6.4 million people in 2017.

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The results presented in this Annual Report would not have been possible without SNV's 1,220 professional and committed staff members around the globe. Their continued efforts enable SNV to create impact at scale.

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